Washing Cloth Diapers

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Washing cloth diapers doesn’t have to be a pain in the butt. Once you get into a routine and find the most convenient methods for your living space, it’s really not too difficult. It’s definitely worth the money saved and not having to run to the store for new diapers.

Previously, I talked about all the great benefits of cloth diapers, particularly using cotton terry squares. Now, I want to share with you how to keep them hygienic and stain-free.

How to Prevent Crying in Infants

how to reduce crying

Is your baby crying a lot? Do you wonder what the secret is for having a chilled out, happy baby?

People often comment to me how relaxed and happy my son is. He has a bad day now and again, but generally he is a very easy, relaxed baby. That’s not to say he just sits around, he’s quite active. However, he rarely cries, is often capable of entertaining himself, and happy.

These are my tips on surviving the newborn period with minimal crying.

How to keep a memory journal for your children

How to create a memory journal for your kids

When I was pregnant with my son, I didn’t want to keep a traditional baby book. I knew I’d have a hard time taking the right photos. Some pages would end up empty (for example, we didn’t have a baby shower and they’re not a common event here). Then, there would be getting the photos printed into the awkward and varied sizes many baby books demand… I wanted to make something that wouldn’t feel incomplete…

Pacifier Use – risks, benefits and tips.

pros and cons of pacifier use

You will find here everything you need to know about the pros and cons of pacifier use for your baby.

This was something I really thought long and hard about while I was pregnant with my first. For many it is a controversial topic. Should you let your baby use a pacifier or just let them suck their thumb or fingers? Does it really matter in the long run?

These are all the arguments for and against pacifier use…

Intercultural Relationships Part 2: Navigating the language barrier

language barriers in relationships

In part 1, I talked about how to navigate cultural issues. What about when this is compounded by a language barrier? Your home will probably have a dominant language, the one that both of you speak well enough to communicate in. This may be your native language, your partners, or perhaps even a third language which is a second language for both (such as the official language of the country you’re living in, and the couple have no other common language).

Most people can’t or don’t communicate effectively with people who already speak their native language, and we are unfortunately living in an era of declining social skills. When your partner is from a different language background, effective communication skills become even more important.

With the following advice I’m assuming there is enough language skill for most day-to-day communication, that you can generally understand each other, but may have occasional miscommunications or misunderstandings. These may arise from grammatical mistakes, misused or confused vocabulary, difficulty expressing complex ideas or forming complex sentences, etc.

How I managed gestational diabetes with diet and exercise only

How I managed gestational diabetes with diet and exercise

Being diagnosed with gestational diabetes is tough. When I got pregnant, I knew I had a lot of risk factors, but the diagnosis was still a bit of a shock. Before pregnancy, I had made a lot of progress with weight loss. I was hoping that this would be enough to reduce my risk, but it wasn’t. At 26 weeks I had the glucose tolerance test, and was informed of the bad news. I was devastated. I let myself be sad for a couple of days, then I started doing research.

This second part, is the important part. I took the initiative to learn about it myself. I was booked in to see a dietician after my results came back, but I can say that if I tried to follow what she said I would not have been able to stick to it, felt a failure, and ended up on insulin or other drugs to control my sugar levels.

What they advised was, heavy restriction of both carbs and fat. What is left after this? Fibre and protein. A great way to rapidly become emaciated. It might be an ok diet for short term weight loss, but this is not particularly appropriate during pregnancy.

What I opted for instead was a low carb keto diet. It kept my blood sugar in a great range, and I maintained a decent weight range. Growth scans also showed my baby was growing normally, not the high growth rate you’d expect with gestational diabetes. He was born at a healthy, normal weight of 3.5kg, and I was also able to carry him to my due date and avoid an early induction.

If you’ve just been diagnosed with gestational diabetes, I hope you can be inspired by my story.

This is what I did…